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  • Catholic military chaplains sometimes find peace in a war zone

    SAN DIEGO (CNS) -- It may sound like an oxymoron, but Father Michael A. Mikstay says some of the most peaceful moments of his military chaplaincy have been spent in a war zone. Knowing that he is bringing peace, comfort and pastoral care to the men and woman serving their country in a combat zone has given the long-serving Navy chaplain an enormous sense of serenity that mutes the danger, chaos, calamity, casualties and atrocities he has also seen in war.

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  • U.S. bishops speak out against attack in Turkey

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Following the June 28 terrorist attack on Istanbul's Ataturk airport in Turkey, the president of the U.S. bishops' conference and Chicago's archbishop issued statements emphasizing the need to find comfort in faith and show support the suffering with prayer and generosity.

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  • Pro-life outreach's mobile clinics in U.S. cities serve pregnant women

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Save the Storks says that four out of five women who board a Stork Bus will choose life after seeing the ultrasound images of their unborn child. Save the Storks, a pro-life ministry founded by Joe and Ann Baker, currently has 18 Mercedes sprinter buses located in different U.S. cities, including Boston; Savannah, Georgia; Silver Spring, Maryland; and Sacramento, California. Buses also are in cities in Texas, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Oregon.

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  • Supreme Court strikes down Texas abortion clinic regulations

    Washington D.C., Jun 27, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- This story is developing. Check back soon for updates. On Monday, the Supreme Court struck down a 2013 Texas law regulating the safety of abortion clinics, saying in a 5-3 decision that it put an undue burden on a women’s right to an abortion.

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  • A mercy and peacebuilding approach to gun violence

    Below is a background document on gun violence published by the Catholic Social Ministry Gathering in Jan. 26, which organized by the USCCB Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development in collaboration with four other USCCB departments and 16 national Catholic organizations. -- Ed.

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  • Bishops seek assault weapons ban, say civilians have no need for them

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Two U.S. church leaders called for a ban on the sale of military-style assault weapons, saying they have no place in the hands of civilians. Archbishop Blase J. Cupich of Chicago and Bishop Kevin J. Farrell of Dallas issued their appeals in response to recent incidents in which people have been killed by attackers armed with semi-automatic rifles.

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  • Artists' work in Washington exhibit focuses on immigrant experience

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Artwork on display in a new exhibit at a Washington museum captures the immigrant experience. The art by 10 immigrants who left their countries in Latin America for different reasons over the past several decades and have made Washington their home is on display at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center.

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  • The Catholic Church has something to say about your paycheck

    Washington D.C., Jun 22, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- “To defraud anyone of wages that are his due is a great crime which cries to the avenging anger of Heaven.” This statement from Pope Leo XII's 1891 encyclical “Rerum Novarum” is jarring, especially in an economy that appears to have as much to do with Church teaching as spiders do with spelling bees.

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  • Supreme Court tie vote blocks temporary plan to stop deportations

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- With a tie vote June 23, the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Obama administration's plan to temporarily protect more than 4 million unauthorized immigrants from deportation. The court's 4-4 vote leaves in place a lower court injunction blocking the administration's immigration policy with the one-page opinion stating: "The judgment is affirmed by an equally divided court."

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  • Saints' relics seen as reminder of today's threats to religious liberty

    BALTIMORE (CNS) -- Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori linked urgent matters of "immigration, marriage and the church's teaching on sexuality" to a pair of 16th-century martyrs during a June 21 Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore that began the fifth annual Fortnight for Freedom.

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  • Blueprint of Catholic response to Orlando: Pray, act, show solidarity

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- As Orlando, Florida, and the nation moves on from the shock of the June 12 nightclub attack, many are finding that there is no set path to find solace. But in the midst of collective mourning over the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the Catholic Church had something to say not only about the senseless attack on human life but also about finding peace in troubled times and showing solidarity with the suffering.

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  • Bishops, others offer consolation, resolve after Orlando shootings

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Bishops of dioceses which themselves fell victim to mass shootings in recent years were among the flood of Catholic leaders offering condolences and consolation to survivors and family members of the victims of the mass shooting June 12 at a gay nightclub attack in Orlando, Florida.

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  • Chairman, witnesses at hearing look at threats to religious freedom

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- U.S. Rep. Chris Smith, R-New Jersey, said June 16 that "religious liberty is called America's 'first freedom.'" "(Religious liberty) is the right to believe, or not to believe, and to practice one's religion according to the dictates of one's own conscience," said Smith, who convened a hearing on Capitol Hill on global threats to religious freedom.

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  • 'State of Women' panel proposes solutions to sex, labor trafficking

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Evelyn Chumbow was 9 years old when she was trafficked from Cameroon and enslaved in Silver Spring, Maryland, just outside the nation's capital. There, she was beaten severely and forced to cook, clean and take care of her trafficker's children without pay or education until she escaped to a local Catholic church at 17, where she found help from Catholic Charities.

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  • 'God is here to grieve with us,' says priest aiding grieving families

    ORLANDO, Fla. (CNS) -- Father Jorge Torres admits he has shed a lot of tears since June 12. The same is true for Father Miguel Gonzalez, who along with Father Torres, other Orlando area priests, representatives of Catholic Charities and religious leaders of other faith communities spent hours counseling some of the 49 families who lost a loved one during the nation's worst mass shooting that occurred during Latin night at Pulse nightclub.

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  • Rising interest seen in curbing payday loans

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- When the federal Consumer Financial Protection Board issued its proposed rule June 2 intended to curb the practice of payday lending, it opened an official comment period for the public to weigh in.

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  • How can the US counter religious extremism?

    Washington D.C., Jun 16, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- Despite secularization in some countries, “the world is becoming more religious” and the United States needs to factor this into its foreign policy, one religious freedom expert said Thursday.

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  • History, mystery uncovered in Vermont tabernacle's renovation

    ORLEANS, Vt. (CNS) -- When Father Timothy Naples sent the tabernacle from St. Theresa Church in Orleans to be refurbished, he was surprised to learn a list of names had been tucked inside its lining. He thought they were the names of people who had given the tabernacle to the church in 1952.

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  • Youngest Orlando shooting victim just graduated from Catholic high school

    PHILADELPHIA (CNS) -- Akyra Murray, who just recently graduated from West Catholic Preparatory High School, was the youngest victim of the Orlando nightclub shooting June 12. According to news reports, Murray's family went to Orlando to celebrate her graduation, and she and her cousin and friend decided to go dancing at Pulse, which admits teens.

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  • Catholic Charities in Minnesota archdiocese to end two longtime services

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (CNS) -- In the coming months, Catholic Charities of St. Paul and Minneapolis will close its Seton Prenatal Clinic and cease its adoption program. Citing declining numbers, and changes in health care regulations and industry trends, Tim Marx, the agency's president and CEO, said the clinic, which provides health care to low-income or uninsured women, will close in August and is working on a transition plan.

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  • Church agencies looking for answers in response to new overtime rule

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Rosemary Miller, executive director of Catholic Social Services of Montana, has long tried to ensure that the four social workers on her staff earn a fair wage, but a new federal rule governing overtime pay is giving her concern that the operation is going to take a big financial hit.

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  • 'The Greatest' got his start working at a Louisville Catholic college

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (CNS) -- It may seem improbable that the late boxing legend Muhammad Ali, a devout Muslim, would be closely connected with a Catholic religious order. As a young teen, Ali, then known as Cassius Clay, worked at the library of Nazareth College, now-Spalding University. He cleaned and tended the front desk while the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, founders of the school, had dinner.

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  • Board scraps Philadelphia seminary consolidation plan

    PHILADELPHIA (CNS) -- The board of trustees of Philadelphia's St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood has called for scrapping the planned consolidation of seminary operations on one 30-acre section of the campus and instead moving its operations off-campus.

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  • Meet the Papal Ninja who's taking a hit TV show by storm

    Berkeley, Calif., Jun 8, 2016 CNA.- Two minutes and thirty seconds is all it took for Sean Bryan to complete the Los Angeles qualifier round of American Ninja Warrior.   The season eight premiere of the hit NBC/Esquire show – which follows competitors as they try to complete obstacles courses of increasing difficulty – featured the amateur flying through every obstacle. He even climbed the newly designed, 14.5-foot Warped Wall on his first try.

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  • Decisions on immigration, abortion still to come from Supreme Court

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- The U.S. Supreme Court, with just weeks to go in its current term, has yet to release major decisions on two issues of concern to the Catholic Church: immigration and abortion. The immigration ruling will determine the legal status of more than 4 million people who are currently protected from deportation by President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration policy, actions that have been challenged by 26 states.

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  • Sisters who also are mothers bring new perspectives to religious life

    GLENMOORE, Pa. (CNS) -- The way Sister Rita Cameron sees it, her grandchildren didn't lose a grandmother when she became a sister. They gained 106 great-aunts. "Everybody loves them," said Sister Cameron, who is vocations director for the Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Dubuque, Iowa.

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  • LA archdiocese prays novena as assisted suicide law looms

    Los Angeles, Calif., Jun 7, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- California’s assisted suicide bill will go into effect on June 9, and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles is fighting back — with prayer. On June 1, Auxiliary Bishop David G. O’Connell celebrated Mass at Santa Teresita, a home for seniors in need of assisted living and nursing services. The Mass marked the beginning of a call to nine days of prayer and fasting for the elderly, disabled and terminally ill.

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  • How Muhammad Ali inspired hope in those who suffered

    Denver, Colo., Jun 6, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- On January 19, 1981, in Los Angeles, Muhammad Ali talked a man down from jumping off a ninth-floor fire escape, an event that made national news. “Former heavyweight champions slip out of the news as easily as ex-presidents, but Muhammad Ali was never your garden-variety champion of all the world,” Walter Cronkite said on the Jan. 20, 1981, edition of the CBS Evening News. “Yesterday in Los Angeles, he responded like a superhero when a distraught man threatened suicide.”

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  • Supreme Court agrees to review two death-row cases next term

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- The U.S. Supreme Court agreed June 6 to take on two very different death penalty cases from Texas in its next term. The court, looking at specific angles of the death penalty, will examine potential racial bias influencing sentencing and the use of outdated standards in determining intellectual disabilities in capital cases.

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  • History of solitary confinement

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Solitary confinement has been used for nearly 190 years. After a period when its effectiveness was questioned, prison administrators returned to the practice as a way to discipline unruly and misbehaving inmates. Here is a brief history of solitary confinement in the United States.

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  • First Amendment, Gospel a 'double mandate' for Catholic press, Erlandson says

    ST. LOUIS (CNS) -- Catholic communicators "have a double mandate: the First Amendment of the Constitution and the Gospel," Greg Erlandson told the Catholic Media Conference in St. Louis. Erlandson, former president and publisher of Our Sunday Visitor, received the Bishop John England Award June 2 from the Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada.

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  • Archbishop Chaput clarifies 'Amoris Laetitia' committee

    Philadelphia, Pa., Jun 1, 2016 CNA/EWTN News.- Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia described as “misleading” an article claiming that his leadership of a working group on the Pope’s most recent document “sends a signal” regarding U.S. policy on Communion.

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